232/365 on Flickr.

232/365 on Flickr.

did-you-kno:

Inspired by events similar to the recent Michael Brown case in Ferguson, three teen siblings in Georgia are about to release an app that allows users to report incidents of police brutality and rate the offending officers by name.
Source

did-you-kno:

Inspired by events similar to the recent Michael Brown case in Ferguson, three teen siblings in Georgia are about to release an app that allows users to report incidents of police brutality and rate the offending officers by name.

Source

skulls-and-tea:

Time for some reading.



The Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces, by Radley Balko (2013)



About the book: [x]

Podcast interview with the author: [x]



Purchase the book: 

  • Amazon: [x]
  • Powell’s: [x]
  • Google ebook: [x]
  • Itunes ebook: [x]
230/365 on Flickr.

230/365 on Flickr.

jontronshat:

wentdog:

The ’50s were fucked up man.

*tries this at next house party*


Ohmygod.. D, you will find this fucking hysterical, I’m sure :)))

jontronshat:

wentdog:

The ’50s were fucked up man.

*tries this at next house party*

Ohmygod.. D, you will find this fucking hysterical, I’m sure :)))

229/365 on Flickr.

229/365 on Flickr.

bassoonerthebetter:

coelasquid:

girlgrowingsmall:

beastlyart:

boosket:

ask-bloody-fundanny:

roughkiss:

spookytheford:

did-you-kno:

Source

Oh god thank fucking christ.

I usually don’t reblog these, but I feel like some of my followers could probably use the reassurance. I definitely have these kinds of thoughts sometimes.

so i’m not crazy for randomly thinking such thoughts? what a relief!

Edgar Allan Poe had a name for it too: The Imp of the Perverse. he compared the impulses to a demon that urges people to do the wrong thing simply because it can be done

The compulsion to jump from high places is called “l’appel du vide" in French. The call of the void. I think it’s specific to that one instance, but I think it’s a cool phrase for this phenomenon in general.
I think about this with random sharp objects laying around, too. “What if I just jammed this into my eye or throat right now? … oh god WHAT.” Just… fucking christ, brain. Don’t.

Reblogging this again because most people don’t/never know how normal these thoughts are, and that can be a major source of stress. It’s okay. You’re okay. Just, you know, don’t follow through on that shit.

Sometimes I wonder if the occasional vivid images in my head of myself falling into traffic or tripping and knocking my teeth out or dropping expensive, precious things are points where I failed the mission and had to respawn and start over.

Real Talk: Intrusive thoughts are the entire basis of obsessive-compulsive disorder.  While the majority of people can experience these thoughts and then quickly know that it’s just a bit weird and not going to happen, people with OCD can’t.  One intrusive thought can set off an obsession, a terrified fixation with the implications of the thought, causing one to experience more and more constantly for months or years.  Just some insight into the part of OCD that is rarely explored or even generally known about, because sufferers of the disorder may whole-heartedly believe themselves to be capable of carrying out their violent or fearful thoughts.

bassoonerthebetter:

coelasquid:

girlgrowingsmall:

beastlyart:

boosket:

ask-bloody-fundanny:

roughkiss:

spookytheford:

did-you-kno:

Source

Oh god thank fucking christ.

I usually don’t reblog these, but I feel like some of my followers could probably use the reassurance. I definitely have these kinds of thoughts sometimes.

so i’m not crazy for randomly thinking such thoughts? what a relief!

Edgar Allan Poe had a name for it too: The Imp of the Perverse. he compared the impulses to a demon that urges people to do the wrong thing simply because it can be done

The compulsion to jump from high places is called “l’appel du vide" in French. The call of the void. I think it’s specific to that one instance, but I think it’s a cool phrase for this phenomenon in general.

I think about this with random sharp objects laying around, too. “What if I just jammed this into my eye or throat right now? … oh god WHAT.” Just… fucking christ, brain. Don’t.

Reblogging this again because most people don’t/never know how normal these thoughts are, and that can be a major source of stress. It’s okay. You’re okay. Just, you know, don’t follow through on that shit.

Sometimes I wonder if the occasional vivid images in my head of myself falling into traffic or tripping and knocking my teeth out or dropping expensive, precious things are points where I failed the mission and had to respawn and start over.

Real Talk: Intrusive thoughts are the entire basis of obsessive-compulsive disorder.  While the majority of people can experience these thoughts and then quickly know that it’s just a bit weird and not going to happen, people with OCD can’t.  One intrusive thought can set off an obsession, a terrified fixation with the implications of the thought, causing one to experience more and more constantly for months or years.  Just some insight into the part of OCD that is rarely explored or even generally known about, because sufferers of the disorder may whole-heartedly believe themselves to be capable of carrying out their violent or fearful thoughts.

Little rant as I’m sick of seeing people dismiss or downright hate on the ALS ice bucket challenge

I don’t understand why some people need to shit all over everything.

Raising money for charity.. …really? You’re gonna shit on that?

You think it’s stupid, don’t do it. But the ALS raised their donations by 1000%. What’s the fucking problem? You think this means your charity won’t get money? Well come up with a better stunt!

This is how the world works, buttercup. You gotta get their attention.

People don’t “just give the money.”

They never have.

228/365 on Flickr.

228/365 on Flickr.

227/365 on Flickr.

227/365 on Flickr.